Positioning of RedwoodJs - Comparison with other Frameworks

I would request the view point of the core team on how RedwoodJs is positioned against

Is there an interest / opportunity to collaborate?

Thanks for sharing a couple of interesting projects. How are you suggesting to integrate them with Redwood?

I understood that @VinayaSathyanarayana’s post is asking for Redwood’s (marketing) opinion on how does RedwoodJS stack up versus KeysoneJs and React_Admin (both being similar to RedwoodJS.)

I thought so at first too, but then I read

Is there an interest / opportunity to collaborate?

And now I’m not so sure anymore.

KeystoneJS seems to be a headless CMS, and there has certainly been talk before about integrating Redwood with different CMSes. And I totally see the appeal.

React-Admin could also be used together with Redwood. It could connect to the RW gql api and be the “admin” interface for all data, and then the RW web side could be the user-facing view of all the data.

Good arguments - I wrote mine to “force the issue” a little (expecting to see whether this is a marketing question). It is relatively seldom to see startups merges, as everyone hopes to hit gold.

Hi! creator of Keystone here. Hope you don’t mind me jumping in.

I’ve been keeping an eye on Redwood and am really impressed, in particular the clear philosophy that’s been there from the start :clap:

I’m not sure I’d see Redwood as being a competitor project as such to Keystone, or at least they both seem like well differentiated takes on the problem space of building apps. Both are built on the same foundations (React, GraphQL, Prisma) but they’re trying to do different things (Redwood is a full-stack application framework, Keystone is a headless CMS that’s powerful enough to be an app back-end)

Don’t mean to hijack the thread too much, but I actually would be interested in talking some time about how we could get Redwood and Keystone to play nicely together. Not sure if there’s too much overlap for it to make sense, but in theory Keystone’s schema and Redwood’s schema could share a source of truth and that would mean people could get Keystone’s Admin UI in app they’re building with Redwood.

If anyone from the Redwood team’s interested in having a chat (even if just to compare notes) I’d be really happy to, feel free to reach out to me on Twitter at @JedWatson

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Hi @JedWatson and welcome!

I’ll pass that along to the RedwoodJS team (@thedavid).

BTW - I just recently watched your video with Prisma last week: What's new in Prisma (v2.17.0) - YouTube

For those who don’t know about KeystoneJS, it’s a great intro. Jed starts ~ 30 mins in.

I actually would be interested in talking some time about how we could get Redwood and Keystone to play nicely together

Definitely!

As I said previously I definitely agree that Redwood could work with a headless cms as a backend with a nice ui already built!

Sorry guys, I was not online for a while. It is nice to see the discussion progressing. Thanks to @JedWatson @Tobbe @dthyresson @adriatic .

Use case 1: Super Schema
Ideally, I would prefer to create my schema (master source of truth) in one place and leverage it for
a. Prisma Schema - for DB Backend
b. Admin UI using KeystoneJs and GraphQL
c. REST API for Integrations using loopback.io and OpenAPI Spec - I know that GraphQL Api exists, but in a number of cases we still need REST API to integrate with legacy systems.

Vinaya’s view point: At this point in time, KeystoneJS schema is a superset and can be used to generate other schemas.

Use Case 2: Integrated Access Control
We need the ability to define roles and fine grained access control that can be used consistently
across - APIs (GraphQL + REST), Admin UI and Front End.

Use case 3: Easy / Fast Way to build Front End Apps
I am hoping that in the end we will get an easy and fast way to build front end apps.

I will be happy to participate in the discussion { KeystoneJs + RedwoodJs}

Hey Jed, thanks for joining the discussion! I really enjoyed your presentation at the recent Prisma meetup, and thought it was interesting how much overlap there was between the tech that we’re using.

At the same time, as you say, we’re aiming at slightly adjacent use cases, Redwood has never gone after the CMS space. I agree that there’s some potential integration points between Redwood and Keystone and would be happy to brainstorm in that area.